Learn to Drive 2019

Natural Remedies for Anxiety

Written on 02/16/2019
WebConnect Ltd


Please check that the remedies mentioned below do not make you sleepy or tired before driving. If in any doubt, consult your GP first. Remember, it is illegal to drive under the influence of drugs.

The following information was taken from and credited to: Health.com


Chamomile



If you have a jittery moment, a cuppa  might help calm you down. Some compounds in chamomile (Matricaria recutita)bind to the  as drugs like Valium.

You can also take it as a supplement, typically standardized to contain 1.2% apigenin (an active ingredient), along with dried chamomile flowers. In one  at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, in Philadelphia, patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) who took chamomile supplements for eight weeks had a significant decrease in anxiety symptoms compared to patients taking placebo.


Green Tea



They say Japanese Buddhist monks could meditate for hours, both alert and relaxed. One reason may have been an amino acid in their  called L-theanine, says Mark Blumenthal, of the .

Research shows that L-theanine helps curb a rising heart rate and blood pressure, and a few small human studies have found that it reduces anxiety. In one , anxiety-prone subjects were calmer and more focused during a test if they took 200 milligrams of L-theanine beforehand.

You can get that much L-theanine from green tea, but you'll have to drink many cups—as few as five, as many as 20.


Hops



Yes, it's in beer, but you won't get the tranquilizing benefits of the bitter herb hops (Humulus lupulus) from a brew. The sedative compound in hops is a volatile oil, so you get it in extracts and tinctures—and as aromatherapy in hops pillows.

"It's very bitter, so you don't see it in tea much, unless combined with chamomile or mint," says Blumenthal. Hops is often used as a sedative, to , often with another herb, valerian. Note: Don't take sedative herbs if you are taking a prescription tranquilizer or sedative, and let your doctor know any supplements you are taking.

DO NOT DRIVE IF USING HOPS AS A SEDATIVE DURING THE DAY!


Valerian



DO NOT DRIVE IF TAKING VALERIAN DURING THE DAY!

Some herbal supplements reduce anxiety without making you sleepy (such as L-theanine or green tea), while others are sedatives. (Valeriana officinalis) is squarely in the second category. It is a sleep aid, for insomnia. It contains sedative compounds; the German government has approved it as a treatment for sleep problems.

Valerian smells kind of nasty, so most people take it as a capsule or tincture, rather than a tea. If you want to try it, take it in the evening—not before you go to work! Valerian is often combined with other sedative herbs such as hops, chamomile, and lemon balm.


Lemon Balm



Named after the Greek word for "honey bee," lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), has been used at least since the Middle Ages to reduce stress and anxiety, and help with sleep. In one  of healthy volunteers, those who took standardized lemon balm extracts (600 mg) were more calm and alert than those who took a placebo.

While it's generally safe, be aware that some studies have found that taking too much can actually make you more anxious. So follow directions and start with the smallest dose. Lemon balm is sold as a , capsule, and tincture. It's often combined with other calming herbs such as hops, chamomile, and valerian.


Excercise



Exercise is safe, good for the brain, and a powerful antidote to  and anxiety, both immediately and in the long term. "If you exercise on a regular basis, you'll have more self-esteem and feel healthier," says Drew Ramsey, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University, who blogs at .

"One of the major causes of anxiety is worrying about illness and health, and that dissipates when you are fit."


The 21 Minute Cure



Twenty-one minutes: That's about how long it takes for exercise to reliably reduce anxiety, studies show, give or take a minute. "If you're really anxious and you hop on a treadmill, you will feel more calm after the workout," Dr. Ramsey says.

"I generally ask my patients to spend 20 to 30 minutes in an activity that gets their heart rate up, whether it's a treadmill or elliptical or stair stepping—anything you like. If you rowed in college, get back to rowing. If you don't exercise, start taking brisk walks."


Passionflower



Hold Your Breath


In spite of the name, this herb won't help you in love. It's a sedative; the German government has approved it for nervous restlessness. Some studies find that it can reduce symptoms of anxiety as effectively as prescription drugs. It's often used for insomnia.

Like other sedatives, it can cause sleepiness and drowsiness, so don't take it—or valerian, hops, kava, lemon balm, or other sedative herbs—when you are also taking a prescription sedative.

Be careful about using more than one sedative herb at a time, and don't take passionflower for longer than one month at a time.

DO NOT DRIVE IF TAKING PASSIONFLOWER DURING THE DAY!



Ok, let it out now. We're not recommending that you turn blue, but yoga breathing has been shown to be effective in lowering stress and anxiety. In his bestselling 2011 book Spontaneous Happiness, Andrew Weil, MD, introduced a classic yoga breathing technique he calls the .

One reason it works is that you can't breathe deeply and be anxious at the same time. To do the 4-7-8 breath, exhale completely through your mouth, then inhale through your nose for a count of four. Hold your breath for a count of seven. Now let it out slowly through your mouth for a count of eight. Repeat at least twice a day.

THIS IS A TRIED & TESTED COPING STRATEGY FOR ANXIETY WHILST DRIVING & CAN BE EASILY DONE DURING A TWO MINUTE BREAK IN YOUR DRIVING LESSON!

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